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Is "estar de buenas" a widespread way to say "to be in a good mood"?

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Recently I read in Breaking Out of Beginner's Spanish that the phrase "estar de buenas" is a common way to say something like "to be in a good mood." I've found a bit of evidence of this online in some dictionaries, but not many actual use cases (such as on linguee).

The author of the book seems to be most familiar with the Spanish of Mexico City. Is this phrase used in other parts of the Spanish-speaking world? And where it is in use, is it generally synonymous with "estar de buen humor," or should the two be distinguished?

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I live in Chile, where it is used as you say, synonymous with "estar de buen humor". Conrado‭ 20 days ago

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Yes, it is a common, rather colloquial, way to say "to be in a good mood".

The Diccionario de la lengua española, that is, the main Spanish dictionary has an entry on it:

de buenas

  1. loc. adj. coloq. De buen humor, alegre y complaciente. Están de buenas.

It doesn't contain any reference to any specific region. Also, the Diccionario de americanismos does not include an specific entry about it in its article about bueno, so we can assume it is used on all the Spanish speaking regions, both in Europe and America.

I could find usages of the expression in Colombia, in Venezuela, in Spain, and in Mexico.

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Just out of curiosity, the literal translation of it works in Brasilian Portuguese as well. cyberglot‭ about 1 month ago

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