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Are there any examples of neopronouns for non-binary or third gender people being fully incorporated into a language's grammar?

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Many non-binary people now request that new third person pronouns (neopronouns) be used to refer to them, for example xe or ze. These have not been widely used by English speakers yet, but it's still too early to say whether they might in the future.

Non-binary gender is a fairly recent concept for many people in western societies, but other societies have long had similar concepts, which anthropologists have termed third gender. Note that not all those who would identify with one of these would identify with the western terms transgender or non-binary gender.

Seeing as these third gender ideas have been around for thousands of years, I would like to know if there are any languages which have fully incorporated (ie, fully grammaticalised) neopronouns for non-binary or third gender people? I am specifically interested in pronouns that are used strictly for non-binary or third gender people, and not ones that are also used in a generic or indefinite manner (as the singular they is in English.)

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Small thought: If the third-gender pronouns were fully incorporated, they wouldn't be neopronouns, would they? Moshi‭ 17 days ago

@Moshi It's all about terminology, but if neopronoun refers to a coined pronoun (as compared to one that arose in the mists of time) then there's no reason it couldn't be grammaticalised. But maybe it would be clearer if I just referred to pronouns in this question. curiousdannii‭ 17 days ago

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The RAE (Real Academia Española) included for a short time "elle" in addition to the masculine and feminine pronouns "el" and "ella", for "those who may not feel identified with either of the traditionally existing genders.", in its "word observatory", a kind of Limbo for words that cannot be ignored but yet have not been included in the Royal Dictionary.

un recurso creado y promovido en determinados ámbitos para aludir a quienes puedan no sentirse identificados con ninguno los dos géneros tradicionalmente existentes. Su uso no está generalizado ni asentado. (T13)

However, on 1-November-2020, as T13's article mentions, it was removed from said observatory. The RAE's twitter account commented at apchavira's tweet:

Gracias por su interés. Debido a la confusión que ha generado la presencia de «elle» en el «Observatorio de palabras», se ha considerado preferible sacar esta entrada. Cuando se difunda ampliamente el funcionamiento y cometido de esta sección, se volverá a valorar. (RAE)

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One example:

The best canonical/formal source for the Swedish language is considered to be the Swedish Academy Dictionary and the word hen [hɛn] was added to it in 2014 (source: SVT news article in Swedish). This "neopronoun" is gender-neutral third person singular specifically referring to a person, not an object. It was specifically added for the case of a third gender. So now the language supposedly has han, hon, hen (him, her, third gender/gender-neutral).

People have started to use the word quite a lot (though not without some controversy), especially in written text. Not so often when referring to a third gender, but simply in cases where the gender is unknown. Whereas traditional Swedish historically uses denne for the gender unknown purpose - a third person demonstrative pronoun. But which is strictly speaking masculine form, as opposed to denna, feminine form.

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To my knowledge hen is not used only for non-binary/third gender people, so it's not what I'm asking about. curiousdannii‭ 17 days ago

@ curiousdannii "I am specifically interested" and "I am only interested" are different things. The introduction of this pronoun originated from the trans gender debate specifically, even though the origin of the word comes from feminism. Lundin‭ 17 days ago

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