Communities

Writing
Writing
Codidact Meta
Codidact Meta
The Great Outdoors
The Great Outdoors
Photography & Video
Photography & Video
Scientific Speculation
Scientific Speculation
Cooking
Cooking
Electrical Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Judaism
Judaism
Languages & Linguistics
Languages & Linguistics
Software Development
Software Development
Mathematics
Mathematics
Christianity
Christianity
Code Golf
Code Golf
Music
Music
Physics
Physics
Linux Systems
Linux Systems
Power Users
Power Users
Tabletop RPGs
Tabletop RPGs
Notifications
Mark all as read
Q&A

How did 'style' signify names of court cases?

+0
−0

Can you please expatiate on ohwilleke's answer? She asseverated

My suspicion is that the Latin/French word for a writing instrument ends up being used for the act of using a writing instrument to place a name upon something, which in turn comes to mean the name written as a result of this act, which in turn comes to mean any name.

  1. But how does the Old French noun stile semantically shift to signify "the act of using a writing instrument to place a name upon something"?

  2. Then how does "the act of using a writing instrument to place a name upon something" semantically shift to signify "the name written as a result of this act"?

These semantic shifts haven't happened to common English nouns for writing instruments, like pencil or pen, both of which don't signify names.

Style of Cause (Rule 3.3)

The style of cause is the title of the case or the names of the parties involved in the action.

Maureen F. Fitzgerald, BComm (Univ. Alberta), JD (Univ. Western Ontario), LLM with Merit (London School of Economics), PhD (University of British Columbia). Legal Problem Solving – Reasoning, Research and Writing (2019 8e), p 223.

Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.
Why should this post be closed?

0 comment threads

0 answers

Sign up to answer this question »