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Q&A Whence אֶת between partners' names?

The word אֶת /et/ is used with the following meanings: In Biblical Hebrew, it means "with". In modern Hebrew it survives, but only with a complement-of-the-preposition pronoun suffix: "with me", ...

1 answer  ·  posted 3y ago by msh210‭  ·  last activity 3y ago by David‭

Question etymology
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Q&A What is the term for a word that is an instance of itself?

The term for this is autological word. An autological word (also called homological word) is a word that expresses a property that it also possesses (e.g., "word" is a word, "noun" is a noun, "E...

posted 8mo ago by peter_olson‭

Answer
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Q&A Whence אֶת between partners' names?

In fact, the homonyms "את"—one of which shows the form ʾitt- with suffixes and is the preposition "with", the other being the sign of the definite direct object in classical Hebrew, and having the ...

posted 3y ago by David‭  ·  edited 3y ago by David‭

Answer
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Q&A What is the origin of the missing "to be" in sentences like "the car needs washed"?

I grew up in western Pennsylvania (US), where constructs like "the car needs washed" are common. I was taught (yes, in schools in that region) that correct formal grammar requires "to be" in this ...

1 answer  ·  posted 3y ago by Monica Cellio‭  ·  last activity 3y ago by Jirka Hanika‭

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Q&A What is the origin of the missing "to be" in sentences like "the car needs washed"?

Wikipedia gives me the impression that Appalachian English is a member of the Southern U.S. English dialect collection and can be subdivided into a southern variety called Smoky Mountain English an...

posted 3y ago by Jirka Hanika‭  ·  edited 3y ago by Jirka Hanika‭

Answer
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Q&A Why did the letter K survive in Latin, though it was rarely used?

In classical Latin, the letter C is pronounced like K. Hardly any words use the latter K; even imports from Greek turned kappa into C. A handful of words, such as "kalendae," held onto their K. In...

1 answer  ·  posted 2y ago by gmcgath‭  ·  last activity 2y ago by Moshi‭

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Q&A Why was Spanish the only Romance language to lose the initial "F" in Latin words?

Going through the History of the Spanish language article in Wikipedia, I read the section Latin f- to Spanish h- to null some interesting insight: F was almost always initial in Latin words, an...

0 answers  ·  posted 3y ago by fedorqui‭  ·  edited 3y ago by ArtOfCode‭

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Meta Welcome to Languages and Linguistics!

Welcome to the Codidact site for Languages and Linguistics! We're glad you're here and we're excited to see what you will build. This community is starting "from scratch", without importing Q&amp...

0 answers  ·  posted 3y ago by Monica Cellio‭  ·  edited 3y ago by Monica Cellio‭

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Q&A Does English support three-word contractions?

Arnold Zwicky and Geoff Pullum's paper "Cliticization vs. inflection: English n't", published in the September 1983 issue of Language (volume 59, number 3), indicates that I'd've exists. While I'm ...

posted 3y ago by msh210‭  ·  edited 3y ago by msh210‭

Answer
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Q&A Is it really true that all Chinese words have one syllable?

Mandarin is represented in characters. Each character is a single syllable. A guide can be found here showing the pronunciations as romanized in Pinyin (alternative romanization patterns exist but ...

posted 3y ago by Sigma‭

Answer
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Q&A Why is it "pronunciation" and not "pronounciation"?

A quick search gives a regular pattern in the form of trisyllabic laxing Trisyllabic laxing, or trisyllabic shortening, is any of three processes in English in which tense vowels (long vowels or d...

posted 3y ago by Moshi‭

Answer
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Q&A Why "me too" and not "I too"?

I've been studying German lately, and came across something that sparked my curiosity: The way to say "me too" in German is "ich auch" - that is, "I too". A shallow glance at other Germanic languag...

1 answer  ·  posted 1y ago by Moshi‭  ·  last activity 1y ago by Jirka Hanika‭

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Q&A Does Japanese have pronouns?

What arguments are used to answer this question? Does it stem from a lack of agreement over how to define a pronoun? Essentially, yes. Even your own Wikipedia quote has the infamous [citation ...

posted 3y ago by Moshi‭  ·  edited 2y ago by Jirka Hanika‭

Answer
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Q&A How to refer to a whole family in Icelandic?

Hi. I'm learning Icelandic and planning to visit the country a few months later. But there is a thing I can't figure out yet. For clarity, in majority of English speaking families there is just on...

1 answer  ·  posted 9mo ago by aminabzz‭  ·  last activity 9mo ago by Jirka Hanika‭

Question English Icelandic
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Q&A How did "listen to" TV become "watch"?

It seems that people used to say "listen to" and "hear" television, a holdover from radio, and that that gave way to "watch" and "see" over time. Has anyone any information on the timeline of this ...

0 answers  ·  posted 8mo ago by msh210‭  ·  edited 8mo ago by msh210‭

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Q&A Why do Chinese people say "idear"?

In my experience of speaking with immigrants from China to the United States, it seems many of them pronounce the word idea with a final ɹ (even before a consonant). Why?

2 answers  ·  posted 1y ago by msh210‭  ·  last activity 4mo ago by Eric Isaac‭

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Q&A Does English support three-word contractions?

it is not -> 'tisn't 1739 D. Bellamy Innocence Betray'd ii. iii. 112 'Tisn't a Virtue, Lucia, but a Vice, To be so very coy! so very nice. https://www.oed.com/viewdictionaryentry/Entry...

posted 3y ago by shpielmeister‭  ·  edited 4mo ago by Michael‭

Answer
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Q&A What causes people to write compound words as distinct words?

In many Germanic and Finno-ugric languages there are many compound words. One does not write "yhdys sana", but rather "yhdyssana". Learning to write these correctly is notoriously hard for people, ...

2 answers  ·  posted 2y ago by tommi‭  ·  last activity 1y ago by Lundin‭

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Q&A Why does the dollar sign precede the number in English?

In English, at least in USA, people write $3 and mean three dollars (rather than dollars three), while other units are written after the number; no c99, h13, min22, '5, etc. to be seen. Why is it $...

1 answer  ·  posted 3y ago by tommi‭  ·  last activity 3y ago by Jirka Hanika‭

Question English
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Q&A Does Japanese have pronouns?

It is often said that Japanese doesn't really have a pronoun word class, such as in the Wikipedia article on Japanese Grammar: Although many grammars and textbooks mention pronouns (代名詞 daimeish...

1 answer  ·  posted 3y ago by curiousdannii‭  ·  last activity 2y ago by Jirka Hanika‭

Question pronouns typology
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Meta Who should the temporary moderators be?

As we have set up communities here on the Codidact network we've been appointing temporary moderators. Ultimately, of course, we want each community to choose its own moderators; we've been doing ...

4 answers  ·  posted 3y ago by Monica Cellio‭  ·  edited 3y ago by sau226‭

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Q&A Why "me too" and not "I too"?

English tends to use accusative pronouns whenever they aren't clearly the subject of a sentence or clause, even when classical grammatical rules call for the nominative. Another example: "Who's the...

posted 1y ago by gmcgath‭  ·  edited 1y ago by gmcgath‭

Answer
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Q&A Has there ever been a situation of perfect bilingualism, without falling in diglossia?

In many places around the world there are different languages that coexist: some people speak one, some the other, and many can speak both. There are as many cases as situations: some of the langu...

1 answer  ·  posted 1y ago by fedorqui‭  ·  last activity 8mo ago by Jirka Hanika‭

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Q&A Calling another by name when one is exasperated

In my English-speaking culture, when two people are in conversation, usually we don't bother addressing each other by name—or even by any substitutive term of address, like ‘sir’/‘ma'am’ (formal) o...

2 answers  ·  posted 2y ago by r~~‭  ·  last activity 7mo ago by Lorenzo Donati‭

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Q&A What's the difference between "in doing so" and "by doing so"?

It depends on the context, but generally "in doing so" refers to something that happens along with or as part of the action, and "by doing so" refers to a result of the action. In many cases either...

posted 2y ago by gmcgath‭  ·  edited 1y ago by gmcgath‭

Answer