Communities

Writing
Writing
Codidact Meta
Codidact Meta
The Great Outdoors
The Great Outdoors
Photography & Video
Photography & Video
Scientific Speculation
Scientific Speculation
Cooking
Cooking
Electrical Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Judaism
Judaism
Languages & Linguistics
Languages & Linguistics
Software Development
Software Development
Mathematics
Mathematics
Christianity
Christianity
Code Golf
Code Golf
Music
Music
Physics
Physics
Linux Systems
Linux Systems
Power Users
Power Users
Tabletop RPGs
Tabletop RPGs
Notifications
Mark all as read
Q&A

Modern English words originating in Norman

+1
−1

Where should I learn about words that came into Modern English most likely from Norman?

Please example some words which most likely came to Modern English only from Norman (i.e. words which are likely not to arrive from Common Brittonic and/or Anglo-Saxon German).

Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.
Why should this post be closed?

2 comment threads

Post Feedback (1 comment)
Certain suffixes indicate a likely French origin, including -tion, -ence, -ance, -ic, and -ian. Howev... (1 comment)

1 answer

+3
−0

If you rephrase this question to ask about "the influence of Norman French on English", you will discover a myriad of searchable sources and references, and the book Contact: The Interaction of Closely Related Linguistic Varieties and the History of English (2016 Edinburgh University Press).

The linguistic influence comes from the societal change: the French-speaking invaders established their government and conducted their affairs in Norman French. People who had to deal with their new lords learned their language; then vocabulary diffused through the rest of the society. When the Normans had a concept that Middle English did not, the French word became dominant: parliament, joust, mustard. In other cases it became fashionable to use a French term to distinguish oneself from the masses, and both words remain with similar meanings: cow/beef, sheep/mutton, pig/pork are especially obvious. Seek a social change to explain a linguistic change and you will generally be successful.

Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.

1 comment thread

Cow versus beef (1 comment)

Sign up to answer this question »