Communities

Writing
Writing
Codidact Meta
Codidact Meta
The Great Outdoors
The Great Outdoors
Photography & Video
Photography & Video
Scientific Speculation
Scientific Speculation
Cooking
Cooking
Electrical Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Judaism
Judaism
Languages & Linguistics
Languages & Linguistics
Software Development
Software Development
Mathematics
Mathematics
Christianity
Christianity
Code Golf
Code Golf
Music
Music
Physics
Physics
Linux Systems
Linux Systems
Power Users
Power Users
Tabletop RPGs
Tabletop RPGs
tag:snake search within a tag
answers:0 unanswered questions
user:xxxx search by author id
score:0.5 posts with 0.5+ score
"snake oil" exact phrase
votes:4 posts with 4+ votes
created:<1w created < 1 week ago
post_type:xxxx type of post
Search help
Notifications
Mark all as read
Q&A

Isn't lībra pondō circumlocutory? Because both lībra and pondō meant "weight"?

+1
−3

Isn't lībra pondō redundant? It feels pleonastic and tautological — because both lībra and pondō meant "weight" — see below.

Wikipedia translates lībra pondō as "("the weight measured in libra"), in which the word pondo is the ablative singular of the Latin noun pondus ("weight")".

Etymology of libra

Janus Bahs Jacquet wrote that libra

originally meant ‘stone’, thence ‘pound weight’ (i.e., the little stone you put on scales to weigh things), thence ‘pound’ (the weight of one of those stones), and only from that was the meaning generalised to mean ‘weight’ in general.

Tim Lymington wrote that librum meant "'weight' as an abstract concept."

"You will also know Libra as the astrological sign, the seventh sign of the zodiac. In classical times that name was given to rather an uninspiring constellation, with no particularly bright stars in it. It was thought to represent scales or a balance, the main sense of libra in Latin, which is why it is often accompanied by the image of a pair of scales."

"It's from Latin libra, an ancient Roman unit of weight, likely from Proto-Italic *liθra."

Etymology of pondō

"pondo in Latin is the ablative of pondus, which is literally 'weight' (ablative being 'by weight')."

How do these quotations below distinguish lībra vs. pondō?

In my research, I stumbled these quotations below. But what do they mean? Are they relevant?

"It makes more sense if you explain that "libra", which meant "balance" is the actual word that came to mean the unit of weight. The "pondo" part precised the weight. "

“a pound by weight” as opposed to a pound by what other measure?

Edit: why the downvotes? Turns out there’s a mass pound as well as a weight pound, plus the English currency Pound.

Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.
Why should this post be closed?

8 comment threads

x-post https://hsm.stackexchange.com/questions/14650/isnt-l%c4%abbra-pond%c5%8d-circumlocutory (1 comment)
x-post https://www.reddit.com/r/RomanHistory/comments/wcatq9/isnt_l%C4%ABbra_pond%C5%8D_circumlocutor... (1 comment)
x-post https://www.reddit.com/r/AskHistory/comments/wcaup0/isnt_l%C4%ABbra_pond%C5%8D_circumlocutory_... (1 comment)
x-post https://www.reddit.com/r/history/comments/wcaunk/isnt_l%C4%ABbra_pond%C5%8D_circumlocutory_bec... (1 comment)
x-post https://www.reddit.com/r/ancientrome/comments/wcav2z/isnt_l%C4%ABbra_pond%C5%8D_circumlocutory... (1 comment)
Show more

0 answers

Sign up to answer this question »

This community is part of the Codidact network. We have other communities too — take a look!

You can also join us in chat!

Want to advertise this community? Use our templates!

Like what we're doing? Support us! Donate