Communities

Writing
Writing
Codidact Meta
Codidact Meta
The Great Outdoors
The Great Outdoors
Photography & Video
Photography & Video
Scientific Speculation
Scientific Speculation
Cooking
Cooking
Electrical Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Judaism
Judaism
Languages & Linguistics
Languages & Linguistics
Software Development
Software Development
Mathematics
Mathematics
Christianity
Christianity
Code Golf
Code Golf
Music
Music
Physics
Physics
Linux Systems
Linux Systems
Power Users
Power Users
Tabletop RPGs
Tabletop RPGs
tag:snake search within a tag
answers:0 unanswered questions
user:xxxx search by author id
score:0.5 posts with 0.5+ score
"snake oil" exact phrase
votes:4 posts with 4+ votes
created:<1w created < 1 week ago
post_type:xxxx type of post
Search help
Notifications
Mark all as read
Q&A

What semantic notions underlie 'anger, agitation' (PIE *ǵʰéysd-) 🡺 'ghost'?

+0
−4

On October 31 2016, Kevin Stroud wrote

The connection between “ghost” and “guest/host” is mentioned on page 303 of ‘The Horse, The Wheel and Language” by David W. Anthony [quoted on English Stack Exchange]. As I noted in the early episodes of the podcast, that book was one of my primary sources for the Indo-European material. However, you are correct that most etymology sources suggest that “ghost” has a different PIE root. I would probably remove the reference to “ghost” in the “guest/host” discussion if I was preparing that episode today.

Undoubtedly, 'ghost' relates to "the notions of excitement, amazement, or fear" in *gheis-. Historically, vengeful spirits from ‘the other side’ have been an enormous source of fear, and ghost stories are scary stories — this connection is obvious.

Regarding the spelling, there is no single standard for how PIE is transcribed. Etymonline generally does a very bad job, ignoring all diacritics and thus conflating distinct phonemes; Wiktionary uses y and w for the semi-vowels that most transcription schemes would write as _i̯ _ and _u̯ _ or even just i and u. The palatal g is commonly either ǵ (as here), ĝ or .

But how does 'ghost' semantically appertain to "*ǵʰéysd- (“anger, agitation”)"? How do ghosts anger, or are angered? And I've never heard humans being angered, or getting angry, at ghosts?

Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.
Why should this post be closed?

2 comment threads

x-post https://www.reddit.com/r/ProtoIndoEuropean/comments/y014ba/what_semantic_notions_underlie_ange... (1 comment)
x-post https://linguistics.stackexchange.com/questions/45291/why-is-ghost-conjectured-to-be-from-ghei... (1 comment)

0 answers

Sign up to answer this question »

This community is part of the Codidact network. We have other communities too — take a look!

You can also join us in chat!

Want to advertise this community? Use our templates!

Like what we're doing? Support us! Donate